Filtered on: Planning

  • ADOT's Tentative Five-Year Construction Program available for comment

    March 7, 2013
    ADOT’s tentative Five-Year Construction Program is now online and available for your review and comments ...

  • Travel demand models help plan for the future

    January 11, 2012
    Short of a time machine, travel demand models might just be the next best thing for taking a glimpse at the future of our transportation system. So, what is a travel demand model?

  • State Transportation Board 101

    December 1, 2011
    ADOT’s Long-Range Transportation Plan was formally adopted earlier this month. ADOT planners will now use the Long-Range Transportation Plan as a guide to build a transportation system designed to carry Arizona into the future! But just who is this group – otherwise known as the State Transportation Board – that adopted the plan?

  • Transportation decisions driven by traffic counts

    November 29, 2011
    You’d be amazed by how much there is to learn just by counting cars (yes, cars…not cards!)… Traffic counts are exactly what the name implies – physical counts of the traffic on a particular road – and ADOT takes them at approximately 1,400 locations around Arizona.

  • ADOT outreach effort wins top national award

    August 17, 2011
    Remember when we first blogged about Arizona’s Long-Range Transportation Plan? It’s the plan that’s updated every five years and helps set ADOT’s priorities when it comes to the state’s transportation needs over the next 25 years.

  • Research Center guides ADOT toward transportation innovation

    August 8, 2011
    Much has changed since ADOT got its start in 1927. Back then, the agency was known as the Arizona State Highway Department and roads certainly were built a little differently. Methods, materials and technology have changed so much since then.

  • Big construction projects call for detailed plans

    August 3, 2011
    Our communication team moved offices recently, and when I walked into our new building this morning, this is what I saw… Having no idea what this wall of giant blue tubes was, I decided to do a little poking around and share what I could find out here on the blog.

  • Environmental impacts carefully studied by ADOT

    May 18, 2011
    ADOT can’t just construct a freeway wherever and however it wants… Building a road actually requires a lot of careful planning, thought and exploration long before the first construction crews ever arrive on site.

  • The future of Loop 303

    May 5, 2011
    This week we’ve focused on the newest stretch of Loop 303 (maybe that’s because we’re really excited to see it open next week!). But, there is so much more planned for the entire freeway and today we want to give you a look at what to expect.

  • Transportation Planning, part II

    April 19, 2011
    Last week we gave a brief overview of how ADOT plans for future transportation needs through a three-phased approach. We covered the Visioning phase (if money was no object, how would we plan for Arizona’s transportation future) and the Planning phase (given that resources are limited, how should we prioritize the needs identified in the Vision).

Civil RightsTitle VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)
  • Pursuant to Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), ADOT does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, sex or disability. Persons that require a reasonable accommodation based on language or disability should contact ADOT’s Civil Rights Office at 602.712.8946 or at Requests should be made as early as possible to ensure the State has an opportunity to address the accommodation.
  • De acuerdo con el título VI de la Ley de Derechos Civiles de 1964 y la Ley de Estadounidenses con Discapacidades (ADA por sus siglas en inglés), el Departamento de Transporte de Arizona (ADOT por sus siglas en inglés) no discrimina por raza, color, nacionalidad, edad, género o discapacidad.  Personas que requieren asistencia (dentro de lo razonable) ya sea por el idioma o por discapacidad deben ponerse en contacto con la Oficina de Derechos Civiles al 602.712.8946 o en Las solicitudes deben hacerse lo más pronto posible para asegurar que el equipo encargado del proyecto tenga la oportunidad de hacer los arreglos necesarios.