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MVD urges Arizonans to consider getting Voluntary Travel ID

As 2020 deadline approaches, airports and TSA help spread the word
April 10, 2018

PHOENIX – Arizonans who plan to use their driver license or ID card to get through security checkpoints at U.S. airports and other restricted, federally controlled facilities should take action to get an Arizona Voluntary Travel ID through the Arizona Department of Transportation Motor Vehicle Division.

Travel IDThe Transportation Security Administration will provide MVD informational flyers at its airport checkpoints in Flagstaff, Phoenix Mesa-Gateway, Phoenix Sky Harbor, Tucson International and Yuma International. The flyers advise passengers that starting Oct. 1, 2020, standard credentials won’t be accepted by the TSA.

“Now is a great time to get a Voluntary Travel ID because the federal deadline gets closer every day,” said MVD Director Eric Jorgensen. “MVD is making this process simple. Customers can go to ServiceArizona.com and make an office appointment. The website provides information about what documents that customers should bring with them to meet the REAL ID requirements for the Voluntary Travel ID. Appointments also help MVD offices run more efficiently, helping to get customers out of line and safely on the road.”

The Voluntary Travel ID is an Arizona driver license or ID card that meets the additional identification requirements of the federal REAL ID Act of 2005. Standard Arizona licenses or ID cards do not conform to the federal REAL ID requirements because of a state law that says those steps must be taken voluntarily by the license or card holder.

The cost is $25 for renewals and first-time issues. Per federal law, the credential is valid for eight years, in most cases. Customers whose photos need to be updated in the near future may wish to get the Voluntary Travel ID.

Forms of identification  required for a Voluntary Travel ID include one document such as a birth certificate or a passport that proves identity; one document that proves a Social Security number such as a Social Security card or W-2 form; and two documents such as utility bills or bank statements that prove Arizona residency.

For a list of examples of identification documents and for additional information, please visit the Voluntary Travel ID section of the ADOT website at azdot.gov/TravelID.

The Arizona Ombudsman – Citizens Aide helps you resolve ongoing issues with State Agencies.

Civil RightsTitle VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)

Pursuant to Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), ADOT does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, sex or disability. Persons that require a reasonable accommodation based on language or disability should contact ADOT’s Civil Rights Office at civilrightsoffice@azdot.gov. Requests should be made as early as possible to ensure the State has an opportunity to address the accommodation.

De acuerdo con el título VI de la Ley de Derechos Civiles de 1964 y la Ley de Estadounidenses con Discapacidades (ADA por sus siglas en inglés), el Departamento de Transporte de Arizona (ADOT por sus siglas en inglés) no discrimina por raza, color, nacionalidad, edad, género o discapacidad.  Personas que requieren asistencia (dentro de lo razonable) ya sea por el idioma o por discapacidad deben ponerse en contacto con la Oficina de Derechos Civiles en civilrightsoffice@azdot.gov. Las solicitudes deben hacerse lo más pronto posible para asegurar que el equipo encargado del proyecto tenga la oportunidad de hacer los arreglos necesarios.