Hey ADOT Kids! Be a SSP* while being physically active

By Audrey St. Clair / ADOT Communications

ADOT Kids SSPWhat’s so important about being physically active? Well, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, physical inactivity is a major contributor to health problems like obesity, diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and other bad health conditions in the United States. ADOT Kids encourages safe and active transportation for kids across the state.

What is active transportation? Active transportation is a physical activity that is any self-propelled, human-powered mode of transportation, such as walking, bicycling, riding a scooter or a skateboard. 

You can read more about bike safety in this ADOT Blog, but we want to talk about being safe while walking near, or crossing, roads and streets, also known as being a pedestrian! According to the Active Transportation Alliance, here are some ways to be an SSP (*Super Safe Pedestrian):

  • Walk on a sidewalk whenever possible. If there is no sidewalk, walk facing the traffic on the left side of the road. 
  • Before crossing a street, stop, look left, right and then left again to make sure it is safe to cross. At a four-way intersection, also look behind and in front.
  • Never assume a driver sees you. Make eye contact and wave to drivers before stepping out. 
  • Watch for cars entering or exiting driveways, or backing up in parking lots.
  • Walk, don’t run, across the street. 
  • Cross at corners, using crosswalks and traffic signals whenever possible. Wait for the signal to cross, but still watch out for cars.
  • Be alert, removing any headphones or putting devices like phones down while crossing a street.
  • Be visible at all times. Wear bright clothing during the day, and wear reflective materials or use a flashlight at night.
  • If you are under 10 years old, we suggest you have a walking buddy who is older.

Download and print the ADOT Kids’ active transportation activity to help SSP (Super Safe Pedestrian) Pete safely cross the streets to get home. 

You can learn more about ADOT’s plans and strategies to improve safety, infrastructure, education, plans and programs for active transportation across Arizona on the Active Transportation website. You can also learn more about the 6-mile shared-use path that runs alongside the Loop 202 South Mountain Freeway in Phoenix, which is open to all non-motorized users, such as runners, skaters, walkers and cyclists. Even leashed dogs are welcome to use the path.

Click below to download the activity. 

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