State Route 30: Loop 303 to Loop 202 Study

Study Update: November 14, 2019

The Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact were issued on Nov. 6, 2019. Please select the Documents tab to review them.

Study Background

Since 2005, the Arizona Department of Transportation has been studying State Route 30, a proposed new freeway corridor that would serve as an alternate route to Interstate 10. The study area extends from Sarival Avenue on the west to 59th Avenue on the east, and Lower Buckeye Road on the north to the Gila and Salt rivers on the south. The project spans about 13 miles and passes through the cities of Goodyear, Avondale and Phoenix and portions of unincorporated Maricopa County.

In early 2015, after several years of study, ADOT presented the public with four build alternatives (North, Center, Hybrid, and South). All four alternatives were evaluated with a comprehensive screening process using 24 technical (environmental and engineering) criteria, eight cost and right-of-way criteria, and seven agency and public support criteria. Also considered was a No-Build Alternative, which explored the impacts of not building a transportation corridor in the study area.

In November 2017, ADOT held a public meeting that provided information on the four build alternatives and the No-Build Alternative, concluding with an announcement that only the No-Build Alternative and the Hybrid Alternative were being carried forward for detailed analysis and additional public input.  The Hybrid Alternative would now be referred to as the Recommended Build Alternative (or RBA).

In early 2019, after carefully considering the findings from the multi-year screening process that evaluated 24 environmental and engineering criteria, eight cost and right of way criteria, and the public and agency feedback received, ADOT is recommending the RBA as the Recommended Alternative with the following justification:

Only the Build Alternative:

  • Satisfies the objectives of the adopted Regional Transportation Plan, which seeks to develop an efficient regional transportation system for the whole region, and which was approved by the voters of Maricopa County in 2004 through Proposition 400.
  • Is consistent with the voter-approved land use plans and economic and residential growth objectives of the cities of Phoenix, Avondale, and Goodyear and Maricopa County.
  • Will accommodate the projected traffic in the Study Area, which is expected to increase substantially as existing agricultural land transitions to residential, commercial, warehouse and distribution, and light industrial uses.
  • Provides an alternate route and congestion relief for I-10 and other east-west arterials in the area. These facilities will only continue to degrade over the next couple of decades as growth in the southwest valley occurs, even after they are widened to their maximum capacity.

While ADOT does acknowledge that the Build Alternative is estimated to cost $1.7 billion, will have some minor environmental impacts that will require mitigation, and will require the unfortunate acquisition and relocation of 130 residential homes and 13 businesses, the public benefits gained from selecting the Build Alternative outweigh these factors.

The most recent formal public hearing was May 11, 2019. Additional information on this Public Hearing can be found on the Public Involvement Tab. 

Recommended Alternative Map

State Route 30 Study Recommended Alternatives

Potential Alignments Map

State Route 30 Study Potential Alignments

Study Update: November 1, 2017

The Arizona Department of Transportation is studying State Route 30 (previously known as State Route 801), a potential new transportation corridor that could provide additional freeway traffic capacity south of Interstate 10 in the West Valley. The study area is shown on the map and generally extends from Sarival Avenue on the west to 59th Avenue on the east, and Lower Buckeye Road on the north to the Gila and Salt rivers on the south. The project spans about 14 miles and passes through the cities of Goodyear, Avondale and Phoenix and portion of unincorporated Maricopa County.

In early 2015, after several years of study, ADOT presented the public four alignment alternatives (North, Center, Hybrid, and South). All four alternatives were rigorously evaluated using a comprehensive screening process of 24 technical (environmental and engineering) criteria, eight cost and right-of-way criteria, and seven agency and public support criteria. Also under consideration is a no-build option which explores the impacts of not building a transportation corridor in the study area.

Why the Hybrid Alignment was selected as the Recommended Build Alternative (RBA)

Several issues were identified within the North, Center and South alternatives including relocation of elementary schools, complex technical and cost challenges, proximity to sensitive ecosystems, and flood control liability requirements. The Hybrid Alternative was chosen as the RBA because it avoids the major issues associated with the North, Center and South Alternatives.

The RBA selection means that if a build alternative is ultimately selected, it would be built within that corridor.  The Environmental Assessment will evaluate the RBA as compared to the no-build alternative, with a public hearing scheduled in early 2019.  A preferred alternative will be selected following the public hearing.

Study Update: April 29, 2015

The study team continues to evaluate the four potential alignments and no-build option for SR 30. The study team initially had thought a recommended alignment would be suggested by April 2015, but before a recommended alignment can be suggested, the study team has some additional criteria to evaluate. Once the study team suggests a recommended alignment, information will be posted to this project website, and a public hearing will be scheduled. The hearing will be your opportunity to provide feedback on the recommended alignment.

The Arizona Department of Transportation is continuing to study, State Route 30 (previously known as State Route 801), a potential new transportation corridor that would provide some relief to Interstate 10. The study area is shown in the map and generally extends from Perryville Road on the west to 59th Avenue on the east, and Lower Buckeye Road on the north to the Gila and Salt Rivers on the south. The project spans about 14 miles and passes through the cities of Goodyear, Avondale, and Phoenix and portions of unincorporated Maricopa County.